Recipes

Here is the full list of all recipes published on Traveling Chili. Click on the Ingredients list at left to see a list of articles and recipes for each major food item.

Black Bean Dessert

“Black beans for dessert?” I hear you asking incredulously. Yes, as I've mentioned before, Thais don't follow the same “rules” about what is sweet and what is savory that westerners do, although they can be just as rigid about their ideas. I've never seen black beans used in a Thai main course, but this dessert dish is quite common.

Red Chili Dip

This recipe for Nam Prik Ong makes a small portion suitable as an appetizer for about four people. For larger groups, simply scale it up. Some versions of this recipe call for the addition of a small portion (1 teaspoon) of shrimp paste, a tofu sheet or fermented soy beans. I think the dish does fine without them, as they are difficult to find and the quantities needed are so small.

Green Beans Stir-fried with Red Curry and Italian Sausage

I'm not a very consistent chef. I will cook according to the recipe once or twice, but then I'll most likely start fiddling with it. I can't help wondering if a dish would taste better with more of one thing, or this instead of that. Cooking for me is a constant process of experimentation. Sometimes the results of my experiments are good. Sometimes, not so much. And sometimes, the experiments work very well, surprising even me.

Spicy Drunken Noodles

I've never been able to find out exactly how this dish got its name, which in Thai is kwiteeo pat kee mao. Unlike Chinese 'drunken' recipes that I have known, there's no alcohol used in this dish, ever. The basic ingredients are similar to those used in stir-fried meats with garlic and holy basil, called pat krapao in Thai. It does appear that the name actually refers to the diner, rather than the dish. In other words, the name should be translated as 'drunkard's noodles' but that just doesn't have quite the same ring.

Rice Noodles in Thick Gravy

This simple dish, called rat nha in Thai, is widely available throughout Thailand, where for many it's a 'comfort' food. In stalls, the gravy is usually prepared in a large pot and ladled out over bowls of noodles and kale. If you can't find Chinese kale, broccoli is a good match for the colour, crunchiness and taste of Chinese kale. Likewise, cornstarch can just as easily be used in place of tapioca flour (cassava starch) as a thickening agent.

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