Recipes

Here is the full list of all recipes published on Traveling Chili. Click on the Ingredients list at left to see a list of articles and recipes for each major food item.

Cashew Chicken Gai Pat Met Ma-muang

As a seemingly obvious "Chinese" import, cashew chicken often gets dismissed as not really a "Thai" dish, but it definitely helps to balance out a meal that already has many spicy dishes. Although they make the dish look spicy, the dried chillies usually don't impart much heat to the rest of the ingredients. In Thailand, this dish is almost always mild, with little or no spiciness. Since they can be a bit tough, most people just push the chillies to the side of their plate and don't eat them.

Mussaman Curry Gaeng Mussaman

Mussaman curry is probably the most 'un-Thai' style of Thai curries. It's more like a stew than other Thai curries. The word mussaman has no meaning in Thai, other than as the name of this curry. It may be, like several words in the modern Thai language, a corruption of a foreign word, probably Persian if the stories around this recipe are to be believed. The legend of the dish's origin is that it is derived from a recipe bought by the first Persian ambassador to the Court of Ayutthaya (the capital of old Siam).

Chicken Green Curry Gaeng Keeo Waan Gai

Green curry is perhaps the most ubiquitous of all Thai curries. You'll find it on the menu in practically every restaurant in the kingdom, and it makes a frequent appearance at the curry stalls. Although the dish has its origins in the central plains, it's found and appreciated throughout the country. Much of the attraction of green curry is its flexibility. It works well not only with rice, but is also quite popular as a topping for the spaghetti like rice noodles called khanom jeen. It has also proved quite popular for adding a Thai twist to Italian pastas.

Stir-Fried Mixed Vegetables Pat Pak Ruam-mit

This is one of those "standard" dishes you'll find in almost every Thai restaurant. When ordering ala-carte dishes, Thais will normally include one or two vegetable dishes, and this mixed vegetable recipe is the easiest choice; one all guests can agree on.

You can, of course, vary this dish to use whatever you have on hand. It's one of those recipes that you rarely make exactly the same way twice. To make it truly vegetarian, use mushroom sauce in place of oyster sauce.

(Serves 4)

Ingredients

Pad Thai Noodles

Although pad Thai is well known to tourists, and so expected on the menu at every Thai restaurant in the west, the dish is actually not all that common in Thailand. You will find stalls that sell it and Thais do enjoy pad Thai once in a while, but the dish is not nearly as common as many westerners think. It is very much a street food, and perhaps a good example of a strange sort of snobbishness about food. Some things, it seems, just belong on the streets, and are almost never found in restaurants.

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