American Fried Rice

Thai name: Khao pat amerigan

You don't have to be in Thailand too long or make too many Thai friends before one of them will eventually order khao pat amerigan at some food stall or restaurant. I frequently get asked about it by first-time visitors, who assume that the dish really is American in origin, even if they themselves are from the USA and have never heard of it.

American Fried Rice American Fried Rice

In truth, the origins of khao pat amerigan seem to be a little more convoluted. The recipe is a Thai invention, but did evolve during the American war in Vietnam. Thais observed Americans eating big breakfasts of fried eggs and ham, fried chicken legs and assorted other strange foods, and put them all together in a recipe that was somewhat more suited to Thai tastes. In essence, khao pat amerigan is Thais' idea of what Americans would invent if they liked fried rice.

Ingredients

Cooked rice400 g / 1 lb
Sliced ham½ ccut in small squares
Pineapple½ cdiced
Raisins¼ c
Green peas3 Tbl
Green bell pepper2 Tbldiced
Onion1 small headchopped
Butter3 Tbl
Salt1 tsp
Ground black pepper¼ tsp
Ketchup1 Tbl
Vinegar2 tsp
n

Preparation Method strong>

  • Work the ketchup into the rice to coat.
  • Stir-fry the onion with the butter in a wok over medium flame until the fragrance of the onion is released. At the ham and stir-fry until heated through.
  • Add peas, bell pepper and raisins. Stir-fry to cook, then add the rice and continue cooking.
  • Season with the salt, ground pepper and vinegar. Stir-fry to mix, then add the pineapple and stir-fry to heat through. Remove the cooked rice to a serving plate.
  • American fried rice is invariably served with fried ham, cocktail sausages, a fried chicken leg and topped with a fried egg.
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