Mint

The mint plant’s more than 25 varieties probably originated in Asia but today are found all around the world, and have been used by man since pre-historic times. The common Thai variety is a strain of peppermint and has bright green wrinkly leaves. Mint is used in many traditional dishes from the North and North-east of Thailand. Curiously, mint is only ever found in savory dishes. I've never encountered any sweets made with mint, nor do Thais have a taste for mint tea, which is otherwise popular in many other parts of the world. Note that fresh mint leaves are always sprinkled over meat dishes after they’re cooked. This is because cooking destroys the flavor of the mint.

Spicy Pork Salad - Larb Moo

The spicy minced meat salad known as larb is found in many different styles all over Thailand. Variations abound, as the dish can be prepared with just about any kind of meat, including duck, chicken, catfish, prawn, beef, and on and on. Sometimes referred to as Thailand's own version of steak tartar, the meat is almost always served cooked, although there are some regional variations that serve it almost raw. Unlike most contemporary Thai dishes, larb was traditionally made some hours in advance of when it would be consumed.

Mint - Saranae

The mint plant's more than 25 varieties probably originated in Asia but today are found all around the world, and have been used by man since pre-historic times. The common Thai variety is a strain of peppermint and has bright green wrinkly leaves. Mint is used in many traditional dishes from the North and North-east of Thailand. Curiously, mint is only ever found in savory dishes. I've never encountered any sweets made with mint, nor do Thais have a taste for mint tea, which is otherwise popular in many other parts of the world.

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