Garlic

Is there any spice more universal than garlic? It’s certainly as fundamental to Thai cuisine as the chili pepper, if not more so. There are few dishes indeed that don’t call for a little garlic, if not a lot. Food stall owners will typically buy garlic in large bunches that look perfect for protecting your house from vampires, but seem a bit much for cooking. The large quantity is due to Thai garlic’s milder taste. It takes a lot of garlic to give recipes the strong taste Thais expect. I soon found when learning how to cook Thai food that one of the most fundamental rules of the cuisine is: "There’s no such thing as too much garlic."

Pickled Garlic

Pickled garlic is not called for in many recipes, but it can be substituted for fresh garlic in many dishes, and Thais enjoy it as an accompaniment to many meat snacks. At the Anusarn night market in Chiang Mai you'll find huge jars of pickled garlic among the many other preserved fruits. The single clove variety used may be pickled in honey, or a mixture of spices.

Burmese Pork Curry

In Thai, this dish is called Gaeng Hungleh, and it's also called "Chiang Mai Pork Curry", this dish is a specialty of northern Thailand. It originated in the foods that the Burmese bought with them when they occupied the Lanna kingdom, which had its capital in Chiang Mai, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. Unlike most Thai curries, it uses only the tiniest bit of coconut milk, and some versions of the recipe use none at all.

Garlic

Is there any spice more universal than garlic? It's certainly as fundamental to Thai cuisine as the chilli pepper, if not more so. There are few dishes indeed that don't call for a little garlic, if not a lot. Food stall owners will typically buy garlic in large bunches that look perfect for protecting your house from vampires, but seem a bit much for cooking. The large quantity is due to Thai garlic's milder taste. It takes a lot of garlic to give recipes the strong taste Thais expect.

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