pork

Rice with Red Pork

Thai name: Khao moo daeng

This is one of the most universal of Thai dishes. You'll almost certainly find at least one stall selling this in any collection of street vendors or food court. I tend to think of this as a comfort food. It's a good dish for tourists to get to know, since it's almost universally available and is one of the most mild of Thai street foods.

Red Pork

Thai name: Moo daeng
Chinese: Char siew

A collection of food stalls in most parts of Thailand would not be complete without a 'red pork' stall. Most of the time, it's a basic rice with red pork outlet, but sometimes you'll happen on a stall selling ba mee noodles with red pork, and on occasion you'll even find green coloured noodles called ba mee yok, or 'jade egg noodles'. They taste the same but look prettier, especially with the red pork on top.

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Green Beans Stir-fried with Red Curry and Italian Sausage

I'm not a very consistent chef. I will cook according to the recipe once or twice, but then I'll most likely start fiddling with it. I can't help wondering if a dish would taste better with more of one thing, or this instead of that. Cooking for me is a constant process of experimentation. Sometimes the results of my experiments are good. Sometimes, not so much. And sometimes, the experiments work very well, surprising even me.

Spicy Drunken Noodles

I've never been able to find out exactly how this dish got its name, which in Thai is kwiteeo pat kee mao. Unlike Chinese 'drunken' recipes that I have known, there's no alcohol used in this dish, ever. The basic ingredients are similar to those used in stir-fried meats with garlic and holy basil, called pat krapao in Thai. It does appear that the name actually refers to the diner, rather than the dish. In other words, the name should be translated as 'drunkard's noodles' but that just doesn't have quite the same ring.

Rice Noodles in Thick Gravy

This simple dish, called rat nha in Thai, is widely available throughout Thailand, where for many it's a 'comfort' food. In stalls, the gravy is usually prepared in a large pot and ladled out over bowls of noodles and kale. If you can't find Chinese kale, broccoli is a good match for the colour, crunchiness and taste of Chinese kale. Likewise, cornstarch can just as easily be used in place of tapioca flour (cassava starch) as a thickening agent.

Pork Red Curry

Don't let the relative simplicity of the ingredients fool you, with the full compliment of fresh ingredients, this curry can be surprisingly complex. That said, finding fresh kaffir lime leaves and sprigs of green peppercorns is probably the biggest challenge you'll face in making this dish, and it really won't taste the same without them.

Pork Red Curry

Pork Red Curry

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