pork

Pork Omelet

This "omelet" made with minced pork is a common accompaniment to many Thai meals. In Thai, it's called Kai Geeo Moo Sup. Its mild taste helps to balance a meal where many of the other dishes are quite spicy. You may wish to use a skillet instead of a wok to cook this recipe, since that will make it easier to make the omelette into a thin flat disc. It should be about the size of a dinner plate and about the thickness of your finger. The dish is invariably served with a spicy ketchup called Sri Racha sauce.

Clear Soup

Clear soups (gaeng jood ) are a favourite at the curry stall. Contrary to any impressions you may have about Thai cuisine, it's not all about heat. A Thai meal is a balance between spicy, salty, sweet and sour. Clear soups provide the perfect middle ground when there are other highly seasoned dishes on the table.

Clear Soup

Clear Soup (<em>gaeng jood</em>)

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Pork or Beef Stir-fried with Chili

Although the name of this dish implies that the main ingredient is chilies, it's really the onion that provides much of the taste and flavor of the recipe. This is one of the first Thai recipes that I ever learned to make, way back when I lived in the USA. I've shown the traditional pork as the meat component, but it works just as well with beef. You can easily get thinly sliced pork loin in any supermarket in Thailand, but elsewhere you may have to slice it yourself. It helps if you partially freeze the meat first.

Burmese Pork Curry

In Thai, this dish is called Gaeng Hungleh, and it's also called "Chiang Mai Pork Curry", this dish is a specialty of northern Thailand. It originated in the foods that the Burmese bought with them when they occupied the Lanna kingdom, which had its capital in Chiang Mai, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. Unlike most Thai curries, it uses only the tiniest bit of coconut milk, and some versions of the recipe use none at all.

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