stir-fry

Pork Stir-fried with Long Beans

Pork Stir-fried with Long Beans

This is a very common Thai stir-fry that makes a frequent appearance, with variations, at many food stalls. Thai cooks will almost always use what translates to "three story pork" for the meat. This is pork meat with a bit of fat and inner skin layer still attached. Since this probably won't appeal to western palates, I've suggested pork loin as an alternative. Pork Stir-fried with Long Beans This recipe also calls for red curry paste - krueng gaeng ped - to be used.

Stir-Fried Noodles with Soy Sauce

Stir-Fried Noodles with Soy Sauce

In Thai, this dish is simply called kwit-teeo pat see-eew, or rice noodles stir-fried with soy sauce. You'll note it uses all three kinds of soy sauce commonly used in Thai kitchens. I think this dish goes best with pork, but you'll also easily find it on the street with chicken. Seafood is less common due to the over-powering tastes of the sauces. Rice noodles stir-fried with soy sauce and pork Ingredients Servings: 2

Sweet and Sour Stir-Fry

Sweet and Sour Stir-Fry

Some people turn up their noses at sweet and sour stir fry because "it's not Thai". The dish is perceived as Chinese, although if you're going to quibble, Thai food is largely a mix of Chinese and Mon influences so a lot of dishes are Chinese to some extent. Be that as it may, the dish is popular at the curry stall. Its mildness forms a good counterbalance to spicier dishes.

Thai Pork and Ginger Stir-Fry

Thai Pork and Ginger Stir-Fry

Moo Pad King Although it is perhaps not so well know among Western Thai food fans, this dish, made with either pork or chicken, makes a frequent appearance at the street stall. You can also make it with beef. If you can only get dried wood-ear mushrooms, soak them in warm water for a few minutes to soften them up. Stir fried pork, ginger and mushrooms. Variations: If you'd like the dish less spicy, use banana chilies instead of the much hotter spur chilies.