Thai

Burmese Pork Curry

Burmese Pork Curry

In Thai, this dish is called Gaeng Hungleh, and it's also called "Chiang Mai Pork Curry", this dish is a specialty of northern Thailand. It originated in the foods that the Burmese bought with them when they occupied the Lanna kingdom, which had its capital in Chiang Mai, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. Unlike most Thai curries, it uses only the tiniest bit of coconut milk, and some versions of the recipe use none at all.

Carrot Som Tam

Carrot Som Tam

Shredded carrot most closely matches the texture, if not the colour or flavour, of green papaya. This recipe is similar to one that has proved successful at the restaurant chain in Thailand where I used to work, and also utilizes ingredients easily found outside of the country. You can of course substitute fresh string beans for the long beans. For the photo, I left out the dried shrimp, since I don't think they add anything to the dish and didn't want to buy a big bag of them for this one dish.

Cashew Chicken

Cashew Chicken

As a seemingly obvious "Chinese" import, cashew chicken often gets dismissed as not really a "Thai" dish, but it definitely helps to balance out a meal that already has many spicy dishes. Although they make the dish look spicy, the dried chillies usually don't impart much heat to the rest of the ingredients. In Thailand, this dish is almost always mild, with little or no spiciness. Since they can be a bit tough, most people just push the chillies to the side of their plate and don't eat them.

Chiang Mai Pork Sausage

Chiang Mai Pork Sausage

This cooked sausage, called sai-ooa, is one of the foods that Thais associate strongly with Chiang Mai. You can purchase it fresh at most markets, and you'll see coils of it grilling on barbecues at stalls all around town. Chiang Mai sausage meatballs Since most people don't have sausage making equipment in their home, I've adapted the recipe to make meatballs instead. These work very well as an hors d'oeuvre with cocktails or as one of the many 'finger foods' forming a kahn toke style dinner.

Chicken and Galangal Soup

Chicken and Galangal Soup

I often think chicken and galangal soup (tom ka gai) is perhaps the best example of Thai cuisine. Unlike its more famous cousin tom yum the taste of this thick soup is more varied and sublime. The undercurrents given by the galangal, lime juice, lemongrass and pepper make this dish quite remarkable. Chicken and Galangal Soup The first part of the Thai name, tom ka, simply means “boiled galangal” while gai is the Thai word for chicken.